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Topic – To Honour and Remember

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To Honour and Remember

Communities find ways to honour (show respect for) people who have done something important. Let’s look at a few examples.

War Memorials

The National War Memorial in Ottawa, Canada

War memorials are a way to honour people who fought in wars, such as the First World War and Second World War. People who fight in wars leave their homes and families. They fight in battles where they may be killed or injured. Why do they do this? They want to help protect our country and bring peace. War memorials remind us to be thankful for what these people did for our country.

The National Aboriginal Veterans Monument

In Ottawa, there is the National War Memorial. It was built to honour Canadians who fought in the First World War. Today, this memorial is a symbol of thanks and respect for Canadians who have fought in any war. The National Aboriginal Veterans Monument is also in Ottawa. This monument is a way to honour the thousands of Canadian Indigenous people who fought in wars.

Many communities in Canada have their own war memorials. Some war memorials are cenotaphs. A cenotaph is a type of memorial that is built to honour people who died while fighting a war.

Statues

Terry Fox Memorial

Putting up a statue of someone is a way to honour that person’s important achievements. In Thunder Bay, Ontario, the Terry Fox Monument has a statue of Terry Fox. Fox had cancer and decided to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He died before he could complete his run, but he became famous around the world. Today, over 60 countries worldwide hold a Terry Fox Run each year to raise money for cancer research and to remember what Fox did.

Names of Places, Buildings, and Streets

One way to honour people who have done something important is to name something after them. Places (such as parks), buildings (such as airports and schools), and streets are often named after important people.

Viola Desmond on Canadian $10 bill

• Schools and streets in Canada have been named after Viola Desmond. In the 1940s, Desmond became a pioneer in fighting for the rights of Black people in Canada. (Canada also honoured Desmond by putting her picture on the $10 bill.)

• In the 1980s and 1990s, Wayne Gretzky became one of the best professional hockey players of all time. He grew up in Brantford, Ontario. A street in Brantford was renamed Wayne Gretzky Parkway to honour his achievements.

• An airport in Sarnia, Ontario, is named after the astronaut Chris Hadfield. Hadfield was the first Canadian to do a spacewalk. He was also the first Canadian commander of the International Space Station.

Why Do We Honour and Remember Important People?

Memorials, statues, and names of places, buildings, and streets help us remember and honour important people. They are a way of celebrating the achievements of Canadians. They also remind us to take pride in the positive things Canadians have accomplished in the past.


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