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Lesson 03 – Planets in Our Solar System

Read About Planets in Our Solar System

Vocabulary

Read the vocabulary terms to understand the reading better.

The atmosphere is a layer or set of layers of gases that surround Earth.

Cloud bands are layers of clouds in the layers of a planet’s atmosphere.

Craters are bowl-shaped depressions in the ground made by large rocks and other space objects that hit the surface of a planet or moon.

A gas giant is a large planet composed mainly of helium or hydrogen gases that swirl above a solid core.

Meteorites are space rocks that fall to Earth’s surface.

Moons are celestial bodies that orbit larger celestial bodies.

Rings are a huge collection of tiny particles of space dust, rock, and ice that orbit around a planet; each piece and particle in the ring orbits separately from the other particles.

Solar energy is energy produced by the Sun.

The solar system is the Sun and the eight planets and other celestial bodies that orbit around the Sun.

Planets in Our Solar System

There are eight planets orbiting our Sun. Each planet orbits the Sun on its own path. The planets’ paths are hundreds of millions of kilometres apart. At any point in time, the planets are usually all at very different places along their paths. So, the distance between planets is even greater. Earth is so far from the Sun that the Sun’s light takes eight minutes to reach our planet.

Each planet spins around as it orbits the Sun. On Earth, this creates night and day as different sides of the planet get sunlight. The time it takes for a planet to orbit the Sun is one year. Earth’s year is 365 days long. Other planets have shorter years, and some have much longer years.

Some planets have moons and some have rings. Some have atmosphere, winds, and storms. Huge craters, mountains, and canyons can be seen on some planets.

To learn more about our solar system, watch the video by National Geographic on Youtube.

Now Show What You Know!

Complete some questions about the reading selection by clicking “Begin Questions” below.

Read About Planets in Our Solar System

Vocabulary

Read the vocabulary terms to understand the reading better.

The atmosphere is a layer or set of layers of gases that surround Earth.

Cloud bands are layers of clouds in the layers of a planet’s atmosphere.

Craters are bowl-shaped depressions in the ground made by large rocks and other space objects that hit the surface of a planet or moon.

A gas giant is a large planet composed mainly of helium or hydrogen gases that swirl above a solid core.

Meteorites are space rocks that fall to Earth’s surface.

Moons are celestial bodies that orbit larger celestial bodies.

Rings are a huge collection of tiny particles of space dust, rock, and ice that orbit around a planet; each piece and particle in the ring orbits separately from the other particles.

Solar energy is energy produced by the Sun.

The solar system is the Sun and the eight planets and other celestial bodies that orbit around the Sun.

Planets in Our Solar System

There are eight planets orbiting our Sun. Each planet orbits the Sun on its own path. The planets’ paths are hundreds of millions of kilometres apart. At any point in time, the planets are usually all at very different places along their paths. So, the distance between planets is even greater. Earth is so far from the Sun that the Sun’s light takes eight minutes to reach our planet.

Each planet spins around as it orbits the Sun. On Earth, this creates night and day as different sides of the planet get sunlight. The time it takes for a planet to orbit the Sun is one year. Earth’s year is 365 days long. Other planets have shorter years, and some have much longer years.

Some planets have moons and some have rings. Some have atmosphere, winds, and storms. Huge craters, mountains, and canyons can be seen on some planets.

To learn more about our solar system, watch the video by National Geographic on Youtube.

Now Show What You Know!

Complete some questions about the reading selection by clicking “Begin Questions” below.